Classroom Expectations and Behaviors

  • *Follow rules listed in your student handbook

    *Respect each others property

    • Be prepared. Do your work.
    • Do your work well. Do all your work.
    • Do your work on time. Take homework seriously.
    • Turn in your homework. Try hard.
    • Put forth effort. Bring all your supplies to class.
    • Be ready to learn. Study for tests. Listen.
    • Participate. Listen and learn from others.
    • Share your ideas. Finish what you start.
    • Reflect on your work. Make good decisions.
    • Push yourself beyond the easy. Don’t settle for mediocre work.
    • Try new things. Ask for help.
    • I start class on time, sending a clear message that this class is important and setting the expectation that they will be ready. I set and communicate clear behavior expectations. I make sure that students fully understand what each expectation means.
    • My students definitively know what the consequence of a misbehavior will be.
    • I apply consequences consistently and equitably.
    • When I confront a student about a behavior issue, the student always has a chance to tell his or her side of the story.
    • I redirect students who blurt, talk when someone else is talking, or speak in a tone that would be considered disrespectful.
    • I do not use “shhh” to quiet or redirect class. Instead I use the student’s name, proximity, and “I need” statements.
    • I teach appropriate behavior instead of saying, “knock it off” or “stop that.” (For example: eyes on me, pencils down, mouths closed, knees facing me).
    • I am deliberate in building relationships with all my students. (For example, I greet students at door, smile, laugh, share personal tidbits, ask students about things they have shared.)
    • I move around the room, monitoring students constantly as they work independently or in groups.
    • I do not allow disrespect, inattention, or sleeping in class.
    • I recognize that students of all ages need to move around at times during the lesson.
    • I avoid power struggles with students. I choose my battles wisely. I say, “You can do ___ now, or if not, ___ is going to happen.”
    • I am willing to discuss classroom issues with my colleagues to gather advice, support, and encouragement.
    • With my students and colleagues, I follow through with what I say I am going to do.
    • I create ways to involve and communicate with the parents of my students. (For example, a biweekly email, monthly newsletter, parent volunteers)
    • When there has been a major discipline issue with a student, I follow up by finding and talking with the student and seeking reconciliation.